Wulong Tea History

The Chinese name for wulong tea translates to “black dragon tea”. It is thought that wulong tea was first discovered or created before the 16th Ming Dynasty, but how it came to be isn’t completely clear.

The best Chinese teas were often cultivated and skillfully produced for the emperors. These teas were called tribute teas, making Chinese tea became a luxury good, not just a medicinal tonic. Continue reading

Brewing Tea

To get the best cup of fresh brewed tea it’s good to know a few things about brewing tea. Once you know some basics you can adjust a little here and there to get your own perfect cup of wulong tea.

First are you using tea bags or loose leaf tea to brew your tea? Typically for a better cup of tea you will want to use a good quality loose leaf tea. Generic tea bags can sometimes leave you with a dull cup of tea.

Tea bags are usually filled with small, broken pieces of tea leaves. When the tea leaves are broken they start to dry and loose some the the essential oils that give the distinct tea flavor. The tea leaves also need space so they can expand and allow for the water to circulate around the leaves while brewing tea. Continue reading

Wuyi Oolong Tea

Wuyi oolong tea is a distinctive, complex wulong tea that comes from the Wuyi Mountains located in the northwest part of the Fujian province of China. Wuyi oolong tea sprouts and grows in the gaps of the rock in the Wuyi Mountains making the cultivation of these plants both difficult but also spectacular. Wuyi Mountain is a large volcanic mountain that contains a variety of vertical cliffs, gorges and cave systems. Continue reading

Wulong Tea

Wulong tea is a traditional Chinese tea that’s more commonly known as Chinese oolong tea. This tea comes from the same plant, camellia sinesis, as black, green and white tea, the difference between them is the way they are processed and the degree of oxidation or fermentation.

Wulong teas are more complicated to process than other teas as they require more steps over a longer period of time. The process naturally allows more personalization by the tea master which results in an wide variety of wu long teas for a tea lover to choose from.

Chinese oolong tea is semi-oxidized ranging somewhere between green tea and black tea in oxidation — green teas are un-oxidized while black teas are fully oxidized. This variety of tea can range between Continue reading

Wulong Tea Weight Loss

Wulong tea has received a lot of attention for its potential to help with weight loss. Anyone who has ever tried to loose weight will likely agree that any safe weight loss aid would be welcomed into their routine. But does this idea of wulong tea weight loss have any merit?

The other tea that is often marketed as a weight loss tea is green tea. Remember that all true teas — black, wulong, green and white — come from the tea plant Camellia sinensis. The main difference between these teas is the way they are processed. Black tea is fully oxidized while green tea is unoxidized. Wulong tea is partially oxidized so it falls in a range between black and green tea. Continue reading

Wulong Tea Tours

Have you ever been curious to see up close and personal where your favorite teas come from, and how the tea leaves are picked and processed? Well you may be in luck.

Starting in 2009 Seven Cups, a well-known Chinese tea importer, will be leading three separate tours of back-country tea gardens in China. these tours are for the avid tea enthusiast who’s truly interested in observing the delicate and intriguing tea making process and who is not afraid of putting in a little physical effort to get there. Continue reading